Food You Can Eat: Parmesan Chicken

The 1950's--but in a good way.

Note the distinct lack of cream of chicken soup.

First things first:  This is another classic 1950’s dinner entrée from my grandmother’s recipe box.  However, unlike most of the main courses from this time period, this one actually still holds up very well today.  Sure, there’s a shitload of butter, but that’s a feature not a bug.  As with many of her main course recipes, this one is easy to make and leaves plenty of time to mind 7 children, do the laundry and darn your husband’s socks.

A caveat before we get started:  I used sorghum flour so that Mrs. Butcher would eat it, and I also used Romano instead of Parmesan because we both like it better.  Sue me.

Here’s what you’ll need:

5-7 Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts

½ Cup Butter

½ Cup Flour

1 Cup Parmesan Cheese, grated

1 tsp. Salt

Mix together flour, cheese and salt.  Cut in butter until mixture resembles a streusel. 

Place chicken in a casserole dish lined with parchment.  Pat streusel on chicken and cover with foil.

Yes, there is chicken under there. You’ll see it when all of the butter melts.

Bake in a 375-degree oven for 1 ½ hours.  Throw some potatoes in the oven while you’re at it so they can bake at the same time as the chicken. Remove foil and bake for another 20 minutes. 

This is just when the foil has been removed. I told you, you’d see the chicken once all the butter melted.
Golden deliciousness.

Serve with said baked potatoes, and some steamed asparagus from your garden.  Oh, you don’t have a garden?  What kind of mid-20th Century housewife are you?

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About butcherbakertoiletrymaker 580 Articles
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6 Comments

  1. I think when I was growing up my mom made something like this, only it would have been with the “parmesan” cheese from Kraft that came in the round shakey can.
     
    That stuff still has a lot of nostalgic appeal — it’s salty and savory. But it’s definitely not as good as fresh grated cheese.

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